Fish

Sunday, March 29, 2015

How To Deal With Bad Customers as a Server

Being a server never gets better, but it can always get worse. Depending on where you work, sure the check bills may be higher, and you may get higher tips, but you'll be dealing with a lot more demands and at least a couple difficult customers each time you work. I get stiffed at least once every time I work, or I get those one or two really low tips if I manage to receive a tip from every customer. 

It helps to go home with $100 - $200 or more if you put in at least 6 or 7 hours of work. If you go home with less than this, it's pretty disappointing. If you are a server thinking about changing jobs, well, just consider the facts here. No restaurant I've ever worked in has been full of only good customers. I've worked in places and been treated pretty poorly by all races. It simply depends on the person. There will always be an asshole who sneaks their way in to your workplace and decides they're going to take out their minuscule life frustrations on the guy or girl who is placed in front of them. Why pick this person, the stranger at work? Because it's easy. It's an easy way to punish someone for no reason, without dealing with any consequences, since it is a job and that person has to remain professional, and simply "take it." 

These asinine individuals are constantly being reborn over and over again, and it's usually the unfortunate crossing of paths when a nice person actually has to deal with these little balls of evil that walk through their doors. If these people don't tip and don't treat you nicely, basically, you take verbal abuse for FREE. If you have a cool boss, they might do their best to help you get a few more tables to compensate for the loss. If you work for a corporate chain where no one gives a crap about their employees, good luck. The best thing to do in this scenario is take a mental picture of the jerk-off who harassed you and never serve them again if they come back. Or, you can stare at them for a long time until they feel weird. Another option is to imagine them in a diaper with a pacifier because they are basically acting like a big baby and you feel like their mom all of a sudden. They'll wonder why you are laughing and only you will truly know.

I went from corporate chain restaurant, to catering centers, to mom-and-pop oriential cuisine restaurant, to a Greek place run by mean Greek people, and then to a white-owned wing chain where I was treated like a middle schooler, and finally gave another shot to the place I'm currently at. This place is probably the best restaurant I've worked in, but because of the area and the location, not everyone that comes in is a ray of sunshine. 

You will always get that lady bitching at you because her food isn't coming out fast enough, her drinks aren't delivered in 10 seconds, and because the bar ran out of the beverage she wanted. Many complaints are strictly from women. Men hardly ever complain. When men complain, they don't lose their temper and start yelling at you or giving you an attitude. Women however, act like those dumbed down broads you see on reality television. It starts with the cliche facial expressions, then the tonal change, followed by some aggressive body language, and lastly, the punch - a $0 tip (or the 20 cents or 40 cents or whatever tip). All because of things out of the server's control. 

As far as these hoes go, all you gotta do is let them drown in their own suffering. These are the same people who wonder why they're divorced, single, unhappy, fat, and depressed. Their negative experiences follow them everywhere in life. So it's not your fault and you should never let these people affect you. But, I don't have time for that. My goal is to get them out of the restaurant as soon as possible before they become a further inconvenience to the rest of the staff.

Creating an invisible wall between you and a crappy customer is the only self-defense you have. Envisioning a fantasy world or conversation is a way of psychologically separating yourself from reality. That, and staying silent. 

I actually prefer not to come up with excuses. When someone yells, "Where is our food?!" I say, "It's coming." I mean, what kind of question is that? Obviously, if it's not on the table, it's still being cooked. People who are used to ordering fast food at the drive thru are probably the least impatient of all. Wait for food? Especially top quality food that is cooked to order along with 10 other entrees on the same ticket? What a strange concept. 

What do they expect me to say, really?  "Oh sorry, got hungry, and I ate it." Or, "Oh you didn't hear? A rabid hoard of raccoons stampeded into the kitchen from the dumpsters outside, attacked the entire kitchen staff, and is now eating your dinner. I would try and grab it, but they're all foaming at the mouth and snarling. It's quite horrendous, ma'am."

If you're extremely busy and you don't have time to get to all your tables as often as you intended, and a customer starts yelling at you because clearly they're blind and they've never held a service-industry job in their life, just play dumb. Act like you are unaware of their anger. This will actually exhaust them because in their anger, they are working themselves up hoping to get a reaction from you - whether it be retaliation, service ahead of the other customers, or free food. But, if you are too busy to do your job effectively, it's not your fault either. It's the establishment's job to properly staff the restaurant and if that wasn't done, then all you can do is do your best regardless of what the customer is trying to force upon you, which is physically out of your control. Trying to explain to the angry customer with facts is ineffective. These people have mental issues and if they are yelling at you, chances are they've been yelling at servers their whole life. All you can do is imagine that they are in a big poopy diaper with a bottle in their mouth.

I hope you have enjoyed some tips on how to deal with bad customers. It's really not all that bad as long as you are making good money. But if you're making low money and working too hard, perhaps try another restaurant. Just don't expect the customers to change because that's one thing you'll always have is client variety. Not all chocolates in the box are going to be sweet.


Tuesday, February 24, 2015

DIY Curtain-Making Tutorial (Sewing Machine Needed)

This is my DIY in photos of how I made curtains with a sewing machine. 

Making curtains is fairly simple. Take the measurement of your windows or however long you want your curtains to be. Then go to the fabric store, pick out your fabrics of choice and have it cut appropriately.

I went with 3 yards for each panel. That's 6 yards total at the cutting counter. I chose a glittery white mesh fabric and a gold silky fabric. I also had to purchase drapery lining for the gold silk fabric since these will be my main curtain panels.

Drapery lining is important because it absorbs UV rays, prevents fading, and creates a better curtain altogether. Some may say you should only use drapery fabric but I disagree. Not only is drapery fabric way expensive, it's heavier and not truly necessary. They don't make drapery fabric in the silky colors I wanted.

Below is my white glittery mesh fabric, laid out. You will need lots of space to lay out your fabric flat. This fabric is for behind my main curtain because I have a double-rod curtain bracket.


Now you want to pin your fabric together where you will sew the curtain rod opening. Fold under any  raw edges to create a seamless appearance and pin. I made the openings about 4 inches wide so the curtain has space to slide on the rod without getting stuck.



Once you've sewn those, you will want to finish the opposite ends of the curtains. You will only need to fold in maybe 1 or 2 inches. All you want to do is sew the end so it doesn't hang raw nor shows the appearance of scissor cutting.



Here are both curtain ends pinned.


Then I sew, using a straight stitch with a tension level 3. Make sure to remove pins as you go.


I lifted the presser foot so you can see how much space I am giving for thread. You don't need a lot. The closer to the seam, the better, and the more flawless it will appear.


Properly sewing means putting the presser foot down.


This is the seam when it is sewn.


Now I can hang my mesh curtains!






Now to make the main curtain part. The associate at the fabric store wouldn't cut my 6 yards in half due to some dumb store policy. So I have to lay out 6 yards, fold it in half, and cut. This is my drapery lining.


Now folded in half, ready to cut.


I lay out my 6 yards of gold fabric the same way. Fold in half, then cut so you have two 3-yard panels.


Now I lay the gold fabric over the drapery fabric. Make sure to sew them inside out. The silky side of the gold fabric should face the inner side of the drapery lining. Pin them together.


As you can see, this is not the silky side. The silky side is on the inside as we pin.



Now to sew. It can be a bit of task to manhandle the giant piece of fabric, but just be aware of any pins and try not to poke yourself. Try to keep the fabric from pulling away as this may cause irregular sewing. It is best when there is no pull of fabric from the machine. You can do this by making sure the mound of fabric is on a surface where it will lay still.


Now to sew. I sew using my tension level at a 3. Sew with at least a 1/2" to 1" seam allowance. This will prevent minor tears, holes or threads from coming undone.


Remove each pin as you go.


Now that I am done sewing that, you will want to trim off any excess fabric so as not to create bulky edges when you turn the curtains right side out.


 Once you finish trimming, turn the entire curtain right side out. The silky side should now be showing. Now you can make your opening for the curtain rod. Do it just like the mesh curtain. Pin about 3-4 inches down so there is enough space for the rod to enter without grabbing or getting stuck or overwhelmed with too much fabric once on the window.


Then you sew again!


Notice how close I am to the edge here. This will make it look more flawless and give more room for the rod.


Here are my curtains hung in the daylight.


Here is what they look like in their full spread length.


They touch the floor. You may trim and adjust your curtains as you like, but I like my curtains touching the floor.




At night, the curtains glow even more. The sparkles from the mesh curtains look like stars!





My total cost for these curtains came to approximately $105.00 and 4 hours of labor. I estimate I spent about 2 hours in total going to the store and shopping for the materials. Much cheaper than if I were to purchase at retail price. Plus, I enjoy sewing, so the hours just whizzed on by! 

There are so many options you can choose so go to the store and pick out what works for you, your home, and your budget. Be sure to clip coupons for extra savings, or shop during sales.

This DIY is mostly for the intermediate to experienced seamstress who may just be seeking some inspiration or seeing how others make drapery. If you are a beginner, first learn to operate a sewing machine and learn technical terms. This will make DIY tutorials much easier to understand!

I hope this DIY has helped you in making your own curtains. If you need help just leave a comment. 
Have fun!

**To purchase custom curtains, please visit www.jadelilythings.etsy.com or Facebook.com/jadelilythings to like my page, place an order, or see what other goods I have created handmade!**

Other curtains I made for my bedroom:





Monday, February 16, 2015

Cindy Crawford: Untouched, Un-shopped, Unstoppable

Cindy Crawford, famous supermodel of the past century, bares an un-photoshopped image for magazine marie claire (April issue - 2015). 


"They say a picture is worth a thousand words."


If this is offensive, ugly or bad to the world, perhaps the message is that society needs to change the way we perceive perfection.

Nice jacket.

View commentary, tweet, and more here:
https://twitter.com/CharleneWhite/status/566204506971856896